Deus Ex: Human Revolution’s Boss Battles Were Outsourced, Oh That’s Why They Sucked

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This an interesting bit of information now coming out about Deus Ex: Human Revolution’s boss battles that pretty much explain why the game’s boss battles didn’t quite mesh with the rest of the game. Eidos Montreal, the game’s primary developer didn’t do them. Instead they outsourced them to G.R.I.P. Entertainment and the rest is history. Deus Ex: Human was a great game but its boss battles were almost universally heralded as overly difficult and unnecessary. Lots of folks felt like Deus Ex: Human Revolution didn’t really even need “boss battles” and would have been great without them.

For Eidos Montreal’s part I’m sure that after hearing the criticism they wish they would have either done them internally or just cut them out altogether. Personally, I thought they didn’t need them and the difficulty spike was ridiculous and frustrating.

A video has now surfaced that illustrates G.R.I.P.’s approach to boss battles in which Dr. Paul A. Kruszewski, president and founder of G.R.I.P., walks through balancing issues, working with Eidos, and how the technology his team built goes all the way back to the 1950s. All things aside though this is actually a very entertaining video on how they created the battles and while they frustrated the hell out of me I now have a firm understanding of the complexity of the tech behind them. Near the end, Kruszwski gives gamer’s a great piece of advice, “If you panic, you’re gonna die”. You gotta get inside these guys OODA Loop…just watch the video and that will make sense.

[source link=”http://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2011/09/18/eidos-montreal-outsourced-deus-ex-39-s-boss-battles.aspx”]GameInformer[/source]

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Lorenzo Winfrey

Lorenzo Winfrey

Editor-In-Chief at ZoKnowsGaming
I am the Co-Ceo of DLT Digital Media. We are a company that is focused on developing new and innovative web properties in addition to developing WordPress based web sites for others. But before I was all that, I was a gamer.
Lorenzo Winfrey