Ready For .Apple, .PlayStation, And .Google, ICANN Opens The Door By Accepting New Request For Generic Top-Level Domains

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ICANN’s Board of Directors has approved a plan to usher in one of the biggest changes ever to the Internet’s Domain Name System. The Board vote was 13 approving, 1 opposed, and 2 abstaining. The Board has approved a plan to dramatically increase the number of Internet domain name endings — called generic top-level domains (gTLDs) — from the current 22, which includes such familiar domains as .com, .org and .net.

New gTLDs will change the way people find information on the Internet and how businesses plan and structure their online presence. Internet address names will be able to end with almost any word in any language, offering organizations around the world the opportunity to market their brand, products, community or cause in new and innovative ways. So what does this mean, a whole lot of issues probably. Since you will be able to basically have anything be a gTLD every major company you can think of will probably rush to secure domains significant to their brands. What will make this even more of a pissing match is that once a gTLD is secured, nobody else will be able to apple for a gTLD that is similar as to not cause confusion. For instance, let’s say Apple, Inc buys .apple then that means that the Apple Farmers Of America wouldn’t be able to buy .apples or anything close to it and vice versa.

From one perspective this is good and could go a long way as far as securing the internet because now companies can acquire a gTLD for their domains and if you don’t see it on a website then you will KNOW that you aren’t at one of the company’s official websites. So if Bank Of America purchased .boa for instance, if you went to a website that didn’t end in .boa you could assume with a high degree of confidence that the site wasn’t an actual Bank Of America site.

Applications for new gTLDs will be accepted from 12 January 2012 to 12 April 2012. But do not think that you can just run out and secure a gTLD for your website because these things aren’t cheap. ICANN charges $185,000 per domain application, which typically requires about 150 pages of policy documents. Then you throw in another $100,000 for technical and an additional upkeep cost of $100,000 each year and the whole process cost a pretty penny.

So what do you think, is this good for the Internet or not? Personally, I can see how it might improve security and brand awareness but then you would have to remember all the new domains which could get annoying.

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Lorenzo Winfrey

Lorenzo Winfrey

Editor-In-Chief at ZoKnowsGaming
I am the Co-Ceo of DLT Digital Media. We are a company that is focused on developing new and innovative web properties in addition to developing WordPress based web sites for others. But before I was all that, I was a gamer.
Lorenzo Winfrey